Google’s +1 button is finally here!

 

After all the talk, Google’s +1 button is now officially here. In a low-key blog post, Google simply announced that the button has launched with a handful of web properties, comprised of the usual suspects. 

google-plus-one

Google is letting people add +1 buttons to their own sites. Webmasters can get all the info on the code by visiting Google’s +1 button code generator page. The code is straightforward for nearly all Webmasters, comprising a JavaScript include for your “head” and a matched set of tags where your want the +1 button to appear in your docuement body.

Ways to Set the Button Up

Currently, there are few options:

When adding the button you have your choice of four sizes ranging from 15 pixels to 60 pixels tall, set the language annotations will appear in, and the option to display (or not) a counter indicating the number of +1s your page has received.

For advanced Webmasters, you may also specify callback functions in the form of a JSON object. You can also pass a URL to the +1 button code. This is especially useful for bloggers who want to put the +1 button in their list of recent posts or category pages. By default, the +1 button uses the URL of the page it is on. By passing a different URL, you can +1 a page using a button on a completely different page. Twitter’s Tweet button allows this functionality, too.

Do You Really Need it?

Aside from yet another social button by which to share, what does this mean for you and your Web site? Although you would not know it from the low-key announcement, this is Google’s most important push towards social search, with so much riding on it that Larry Page has made a bonus plan for Google employees.

Annotations will now be seen by people you (and others) are connected to via Google. However, Google has yet to prove that +1s will have the same far-reaching impact that Facebook likes currently offer.

However, a close reading reveals that Android Market, YouTube, Blogger and Product Search will all see +1 buttons arriving soon. This has the potential to be a game-changer as it will be the first time that user data is really exchanged between these properties. In particular, Android Market definitely stands to successfully differentiate itself against the Apple AppStore – which has no means to bookmark apps or recommend them to friends, even via iTunes Ping.

New Data Nuggets

Web analytics may not necessarily need another metric but +1 button promises to help measure engagement. Official details on what data will stream from Google’s +1 button are not available yet, but Jim Prosser from Google confirmed that “we’re bringing data to Analytics, Webmaster Tools, and AdWords frontend soon”.

Nontheless, there are methods of tracking +1s to your pages. By writing your own Javascript function, you can track +1 clicks as a Google Analytics event using _gaq.push() and use GA’s standard reporting functionality.  All-in-all, the +1 button will now become another micro-conversion that may provide insight to how your site is performing and how users are engaging with your content.


 

 

Twitter now has a “follow” button, to follow the “tweet” button!

 

There seems to be a button war going on all around us. Google, Yahoo, StumbleUpon, LinkedIn, digg — they’ve all been trying to get their buttons in prime real estate on big websites. But 2 players are larger in the space than anyone else: Facebook & Twitter. And Twitter has just escalated the war a bit today.

Twitter has just unveiled their new Follow Button. This follows their previous Tweet Button which is already in use on 1000s of websites around the web. While the Tweet Button was great for sharing single pieces of content, the Follow Button is meant to establish more twitter social connections on the web. So, it’s kinda like the Facebook Like Button, which people place on their sites to get other Facebook users to establish themselves to brands remotely. Of course, the Like Button also kinda acts a bit like the Tweet Button as well (that is, you can also share individual pieces of content from it too).

Are you confused yet?

Twitter’s 2-button concept is actually pretty simple. The Tweet Button is to share things. The Follow Button is to make connections with other Twitter users remotely. So if we were to add a Follow Button to the sidebar on DigitalOnlinestrategy.com, with one click, you could follow our twitter account. This is something Twitter tried to do with the Tweet Button pop-up , but this is a lot easier to understand. Though it also seems like this is actually part of what they were doing with @anywhere — whatever happened to that idea anyway?

And again, it’s all a part of Twitter’s move towards a stronger social graph with much more connections. This will also help with discovery since Twitter is launching the “Follow Button” on over 50 high-profile sites including places like our sister sites , About.me, AOL.com, and Huffington Post. And big sites like  Lady Gaga’s site,IMDb, MTV.com, Jennifer Lopez’s site, and others.